Archdeacon New Year message

Dear Friends,

The year 2016 was an extraordinary year on the world stage: the vote in the UK to leave the EU which will affect our island’s economy in ways our political and business leaders are still calculating and the election of Donald Trump to be President of the US; the horrors of the Syrian civil war and the fight against Daesh (the so-called Islamic State) and the hell war has made of Aleppo and Mosul and so many other communities.

And as we have been shaken by events unfolding on the world stage throughout 2016 many of us will have struggled with personal battles and private grief; my own family and I certainly have.

And so for all these reasons and more many of us have been saying throughout December 2016 that we are really looking forward to a new year and a new start in 2017.

And whilst many of our world cultures reckon the dates and the years differently (e.g. the Jewish New Year started on October 1 2016 and the Chinese New Year will start on January 28 2017) yet if we live in these British isles we are all affected one way or another by the clock ticking over from 11.59pm on December 31 to 00.00am on January 1.

In so many ways it’s meaningless, yet it can become so meaningful.

The New Year offers the promise of a fresh start.

And whilst it’s the same for all of us, of any faith or none, new beginnings and fresh starts are at the heart of Christianity, the technical name for it being repentance – accompanied by God’s glad forgiveness.

As we ponder the uncertainties facing the nations, as we learn in dribs and drabs how Brexit means Brexit and as we wait to see what the Trump administration might mean for the security of the world.

As we hope and pray against all the odds for a lasting peace with justice in Syria and between Israel and Palestine and as we pray and work for peace and justice especially for those communities oppressed by gut-wrenching poverty.

As it appears that some UK and US politicians are at liberty to tell such lies as they like to win votes, the sort of demonstrable lies which would have ended their careers only a few years ago; as I ponder 2016 I have been tempted to despair.
It is then that I have turned to another leader, a king who sets an example of humble service and healing presence and I discover afresh and commend to you that Christ is ‘the still point of the turning world’ and the place where meaning and truth is found, as T.S. Eliot wrote in Four Quartets (‘Burnt Norton’).

Or, as Jesus said of himself: ‘I am the way, the truth and the life’ (John 14:6).

I pray God’s blessing on a broken world, our island community and you and your families as we begin a new year and seek our fresh starts together.
 

Dear Friends, The year 2016 was an extraordinary year on the world stage: the vote in the UK to leave the EU which will affect our island’s economy in ways our political and business leaders are still calculating and the election of Donald Trump to be President of the US; the horrors of the Syrian civil war and the fight against Daesh (the so-called Islamic State) and the hell war has made of Aleppo and Mosul and so many other communities. And as we have been shaken by events unfolding on the world stage throughout 2016 many of us will have struggled with personal battles and private grief; my own family and I certainly have. And so for all these reasons and more many of us have been saying throughout December 2016 that we are really looking forward to a new year and a new start in 2017. And whilst many of our world cultures reckon the dates and the years differently (e.g. the Jewish New Year started on October 1 2016 and the Chinese New Year will start on January 28 2017) yet if we live in these British isles we are all affected one way or another by the clock ticking over from 11.59pm on December 31 to 00.00am on January 1. In so many ways it’s meaningless, yet it can become so meaningful. The New Year offers the promise of a fresh start. And whilst it’s the same for all of us, of any faith or none, new beginnings and fresh starts are at the heart of Christianity, the technical name for it being repentance – accompanied by God’s glad forgiveness.

Read more at: http://www.iomtoday.co.im/news/isle-of-man-news/archdeacon-andie-brown-s-new-year-message-1-8314178
Dear Friends, The year 2016 was an extraordinary year on the world stage: the vote in the UK to leave the EU which will affect our island’s economy in ways our political and business leaders are still calculating and the election of Donald Trump to be President of the US; the horrors of the Syrian civil war and the fight against Daesh (the so-called Islamic State) and the hell war has made of Aleppo and Mosul and so many other communities. And as we have been shaken by events unfolding on the world stage throughout 2016 many of us will have struggled with personal battles and private grief; my own family and I certainly have. And so for all these reasons and more many of us have been saying throughout December 2016 that we are really looking forward to a new year and a new start in 2017. And whilst many of our world cultures reckon the dates and the years differently (e.g. the Jewish New Year started on October 1 2016 and the Chinese New Year will start on January 28 2017) yet if we live in these British isles we are all affected one way or another by the clock ticking over from 11.59pm on December 31 to 00.00am on January 1. In so many ways it’s meaningless, yet it can become so meaningful. The New Year offers the promise of a fresh start. And whilst it’s the same for all of us, of any faith or none, new beginnings and fresh starts are at the heart of Christianity, the technical name for it being repentance – accompanied by God’s glad forgiveness.

Read more at: http://www.iomtoday.co.im/news/isle-of-man-news/archdeacon-andie-brown-s-new-year-message-1-8314178
Dear Friends, The year 2016 was an extraordinary year on the world stage: the vote in the UK to leave the EU which will affect our island’s economy in ways our political and business leaders are still calculating and the election of Donald Trump to be President of the US; the horrors of the Syrian civil war and the fight against Daesh (the so-called Islamic State) and the hell war has made of Aleppo and Mosul and so many other communities. And as we have been shaken by events unfolding on the world stage throughout 2016 many of us will have struggled with personal battles and private grief; my own family and I certainly have. And so for all these reasons and more many of us have been saying throughout December 2016 that we are really looking forward to a new year and a new start in 2017. And whilst many of our world cultures reckon the dates and the years differently (e.g. the Jewish New Year started on October 1 2016 and the Chinese New Year will start on January 28 2017) yet if we live in these British isles we are all affected one way or another by the clock ticking over from 11.59pm on December 31 to 00.00am on January 1. In so many ways it’s meaningless, yet it can become so meaningful. The New Year offers the promise of a fresh start. And whilst it’s the same for all of us, of any faith or none, new beginnings and fresh starts are at the heart of Christianity, the technical name for it being repentance – accompanied by God’s glad forgiveness.

Read more at: http://www.iomtoday.co.im/news/isle-of-man-news/archdeacon-andie-brown-s-new-year-message-1-8314178

Posted 6:57 PM | Permalink